Home quarantine for Jordanian truck drivers passing at Al-Omari border crossing

Home quarantine for Jordanian truck drivers passing at Al-Omari border crossing
Jordan imposed a 48-hour weekend for the first time in months after a major spike in coronavirus infections. Above, an almost deserted road in Amman on Oct. 9, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 10 October 2020

Home quarantine for Jordanian truck drivers passing at Al-Omari border crossing

Home quarantine for Jordanian truck drivers passing at Al-Omari border crossing
  • Jordan confirms 1,246 new coronavirus cases overnight
  • Country went into a nationwide 48-hour lockdown on Friday

DUBAI: Home quarantine will be mandatory for Jordanian truck drivers passing through Al-Omari border crossing as Jordan tries to address a spike in coronavirus cases.

Those arriving from green and yellow countries will be isolated at home for seven days, while those arriving from red countries will be isolated for 14 days starting Sunday, state news agency Petra reported. Jordanian truck drivers currently in quarantine at the border crossing will be released as soon as the legal procedures are finalized, Petra added.

Jordan has divided inbound arrivals into green, yellow and red countries based on their COVID-19 prevalence and health procedures. A seven-day home quarantine is required for individuals coming from green and yellow countries after a negative coronavirus test, while those from red-flagged countries must home quarantine for 14 days after a negative PCR test result.

Jordan confirmed 1,246 new cases overnight, with 1,230 of them locally transmitted, and also 22 deaths. The country’s caseload is now 22,763 infections. and 166 fatalities.

A locally developed app, Dergham Al-Azzah-Aman, has been used to detect COVID-19 infections and transmission by tracing people who had a direct contact with infected cases, and determining the source of infection.

With nearly 2 million downloads, the app detected almost 23 percent of cases in Jordan the state news agency reported.

Jordan went into a nationwide 48-hour lockdown on Friday for the first time in months after a major spike in coronavirus infections raised fears the it could strain the country’s health care system.

The country has seen what Jordanian health officials said was an ‘exponential’ rise, with around 10,000 cases confirmed in just over a week – a near-doubling of the total number of infections.


Hundreds protest police repression in Tunisia

Hundreds protest police repression in Tunisia
Updated 55 min 21 sec ago

Hundreds protest police repression in Tunisia

Hundreds protest police repression in Tunisia
  • Saturday’s protests come as the North African nation struggles to stem the novel coronavirus pandemic
  • The government on Saturday extended a night-time curfew from 8 p.m. (1900 GMT) to 5 a.m. and banned gatherings until February 14

TUNIS: Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Tunisian cities on Saturday to protest police repression, corruption and poverty, following several nights of unrest marked by clashes and arrests.
Saturday’s protests come as the North African nation struggles to stem the novel coronavirus pandemic, which has crippled the economy and threatened to overwhelm hospitals.
Over 6,000 people have died from Covid-19 in Tunisia, with a record 103 deaths reported on Thursday.
The government on Saturday extended a night-time curfew from 8 p.m. (1900 GMT) to 5 a.m. and banned gatherings until February 14.
But protesters took to the streets in several parts of the country, including the capital Tunis and the marginalized interior region of Gafsa, to demand the release of hundreds of young people detained during several nights of unrest since January 14.
“Neither police nor Islamists, the people want revolution,” chanted demonstrators in a crowd of several hundred in Tunis, where one person was wounded in brief clashes amid a heavy police presence.
Protests were also held in the coastal city of Sfax on Friday.
Much of the unrest has been in working class neighborhoods, where anger is boiling over soaring unemployment and a political class accused of having failed to deliver good governance, a decade after the 2011 revolution that toppled long-time dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.
Economic misery exacerbated by novel coronavirus restrictions in the tourism-reliant nation have pushed growing numbers of Tunisians to try to leave the country.
“The situation is catastrophic,” said Omar Jawadi, 33, a hotel sales manager, who has been paid only half his salary for months.
“The politicians are corrupt, we want to change the government and the system.”
The police have said more than 700 people were arrested over several nights of unrest earlier this week that saw young people hurl rocks and petrol bombs at security forces, who responded with tear gas and water cannon.
Human rights groups on Thursday said at least 1,000 people had been detained.
“Youth live from day to day, we no longer have hope, neither to work nor to study — and they call us troublemakers!” said call center worker Amine, who has a degree in aerospace engineering.
“We must listen to young people, not send police in by the thousands. The whole system is corrupt, a few families and their supporters control Tunisia’s wealth.”
Tunisia last week marked one decade since Ben Ali fled the country amid mass protests, ending 23 years in power.
Tunisia’s political leadership is divided, with Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi waiting for parliament to confirm a major cabinet reshuffle announced last Saturday.