UAE, Bahrain welcome decision to remove Sudan from US terror list

In this Aug. 25, 2020 file photo, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stands with Sudanese Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, the head of the ruling sovereign council, in Khartoum, Sudan. (AP)
Short Url
Updated 20 October 2020

UAE, Bahrain welcome decision to remove Sudan from US terror list

DUBAI: The UAE and Bahrain both welcomed on Tuesday the US removing Sudan from a list of state sponsors of terrorism.
Donald Trump said a day earlier he would remove Sudan from the list after the country agreed to pay compensation to US victims of terror attacks.
The UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation said it supported all efforts to remove Sudan from the list.
The ministry added it that it supported everything that "contributes to strengthening Sudan's security, stability and prosperity."
The Bahraini foreign ministry also said it welcomed the decision, calling it a positive step.

Sudan’s central bank said on Tuesday it had transferred $335 million in compensation to the US. 

The money is for victims of the 1998 bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, which were conducted by Al-Qaeda while Osama bin Laden was based in Sudan.

Sudan is ruled by a transitional government installed after the downfall of President Omar Al-Bashir last year.

The removal from the terror list will allow Sudan to access international loans and aid to revive its economy.


Turkey, Russia seal deal for Karabakh ‘peacekeeping center’

Updated 13 min 57 sec ago

Turkey, Russia seal deal for Karabakh ‘peacekeeping center’

  • The deal comes after days of talks between Turkish and Russian officials about how the two regional powers would jointly implement a Moscow-brokered cease-fire
  • Technical details for setting up the joint center were concluded and an agreement was signed

ANKARA: Turkey and Russia have agreed to monitor a truce over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region from a joint peacekeeping center, Ankara’s defense ministry said on Tuesday.
The deal comes after days of talks between Turkish and Russian officials about how the two regional powers would jointly implement a Moscow-brokered cease-fire signed this month between Armenia and Azerbaijan.
Technical details for setting up the joint center were concluded and an agreement was signed, the defense ministry said in a statement, adding that it would begin work “as soon as possible.”
Turkey is a staunch ally of Azerbaijan and has fervently defended its right to take back the Nagorno-Karabakh lands Baku lost to ethnic Armenian separatists in a 1988-94 war.
The truce deal ended more than six weeks of fighting that claimed more than 1,400 lives and saw ethnic Armenians agree to withdraw from large parts of the contested region of Azerbaijan.
The Turkish parliament voted this month to deploy a mission to “establish a joint center with Russia and to carry out the center’s activities.”
The deployment is set to last a year and its size will be determined by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Russia has said repeatedly that Turkey will have no troops on the ground under the truce deal’s terms.