What We Are Reading Today: Billion Dollar Loser by Reeves Wiedeman

Short Url
Updated 25 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Billion Dollar Loser by Reeves Wiedeman

The subject of billion dollar Loser, reeves wiedeman’s indefatigable, scrupulous account of the dubious co-working-space company wework, is adam neumann — the co-founder who eventually all but wrecked it.

Culminating in a day-by-day account of the five weeks leading up to wework’s botched ipo and neumann’s dramatic ouster, wiedeman exposes the story of the company’s desperate attempt to secure the funding it needed in the final moments of a decade defined by excess.

Neumann had two great ambitions when he was young: To grow wealthy and to save the world. Neumann believed his two goals could be folded into one and pursued by the same methods: brash self- promotion, florid salesmanship and an impulsive management style reflective of what he considered to be his own genius.

Walter Kirn said in a review for the new York times: “Citing an interview from april 2019, not long before wework’s unraveling, wiedeman describes neumann as engaged in a belated campaign to polish his image and raise one of many rounds of outside cash to replace the vast sums he’d already dissipated.”


What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics by Mircea Pitici

Updated 25 November 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics by Mircea Pitici

This annual anthology brings together the year’s finest mathematics writing from around the world. Featuring promising new voices alongside some of the foremost names in the field, The Best Writing on Mathematics 2020 makes available to a wide audience many articles not easily found anywhere else—and you don’t need to be a mathematician to enjoy them. These writings offer surprising insights into the nature, meaning, and practice of mathematics today. They delve into the history, philosophy, teaching, and everyday aspects of math, and take readers behind the scenes of today’s hottest mathematical debates.

Here, Steven Strogatz reveals how calculus drives advances in virology, Paul Thagard argues that the power of mathematics stems from its combination of realistic and fictional qualities, and Erica Klarreich describes how Hao Huang used the combinatorics of cube nodes to solve a longstanding problem in computer science. In other essays, John Baez tells how he discovered the irresistible attractions of algebraic geometry.