Greek police arrest suspected Israeli fraudster

Israeli Shimon Hayut, who falsely presented himself on dating app Tinder as the son of billionaire Lev Leviev, was arrested in Greece during a joint operation between Interpol and Israel Police. (EPA)
Updated 02 July 2019

Greek police arrest suspected Israeli fraudster

  • Suspect has been named in news reports as 28-year-old Shimon Hayut, an alleged swindler who duped women on the Tinder dating site
  • Hayut presented himself as the son of an Israeli multi-millionaire and had defrauded women in Norway, Finland and Sweden

ATHENS: Police in Greece on Tuesday said they had arrested an Israeli man accused of fraud, named in media reports as the “Tinder swindler” who allegedly defrauded European women he met on the dating site.
“A 28-year-old Israeli man was arrested on June 28 at Athens International Airport whilst attempting to leave,” a police source told AFP.
“He was traveling on a false Israeli passport. We were in contact with Interpol to confirm his identity, and there was an international warrant from Israel concerning fraud, theft and forgery,” the source added.
“His identity was confirmed by Interpol on Monday. Extradition procedures to Israel have been initiated,” the official said. Police however declined to reveal his identity.
The suspect has been described in news reports as 28-year-old Shimon Hayut, an alleged swindler who duped women on the Tinder dating site.
According to Norway’s Verdens Gang newspaper, the suspect presented himself as the son of an Israeli multi-millionaire and had defrauded women in Norway, Finland and Sweden out of hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund a lavish lifestyle.


Pakistan avoids terror financing blacklist for now

Updated 19 min 8 sec ago

Pakistan avoids terror financing blacklist for now

  • Pakistan’s government hailed the FATF’s decision, which offers a reprieve to Prime Minister Imran Khan as he works to shore up his country’s faltering economy and attract foreign investment and loans
  • The agency’s assessment expresses “serious concerns with the overall lack of progress by Pakistan” to stop terrorism financing

PARIS: An international monitoring agency has given Pakistan four months to prove it is fighting terrorism financing and money laundering — or it could be put on a damaging global blacklist.
The Financial Action Task Force also threatened Iran, which is already blacklisted, with even tougher restrictions on its international financial activity.
Pakistan’s government on Friday hailed the FATF’s decision, which offers a reprieve to Prime Minister Imran Khan as he works to shore up his country’s faltering economy and attract foreign investment and loans.
“Thank God, we have been successful,” Pakistan’s foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, told The Associated Press.
But the agency’s assessment remained grim, expressing “serious concerns with the overall lack of progress by Pakistan” to stop terrorism financing.
In a statement after meetings this week at its Paris headquarters, the FATF said Pakistan has addressed only five of 27 measures required to avoid being blacklisted.
If Pakistan doesn’t act by February, FATF president Xiangmin Lui said the agency could put the country on its blacklist, which currently includes only Iran and North Korea.
Experts say the move means every international financial transaction with Pakistan will be closely scrutinized and doing business in Pakistan will become costly and cumbersome. International agencies could place restrictions on lending money to Pakistan, including key creditors such as the International Monetary Fund, the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank.
“Pakistan has not done enough,” Xiangmin told a news conference.
Pakistan should do more to track money transfers and investigate and prosecute terrorism financiers, among other steps, the FATF said.
Qureshi insisted that Pakistan has “taken maximum steps against terror financing.”
“We will continue to take all the required steps, and all conspiracies against us have failed,” he told The AP.
Meanwhile, the watchdog expressed “disappointment” that Iran isn’t taking the necessary steps to be removed from the blacklist, and said it’s asking all member countries to tighten scrutiny of any financial transactions involving Iran.
Virtual currencies such as bitcoin and Facebook’s Libra are also prompting concern from the FATF, which warned of “new risks” from such products. It said they’re being “closely monitored” to ensure they’re not used to finance terrorism or launder money.